The Longevity FAQ

Inasmuch as one enjoys being alive, waiting longer until the signs of frailty and old age occur seems an appealing proposition, and so there is an entire field of research dedicated to understand the aging process. A recent summary for a popular audience is in David Sinclair's recent book Lifespan. But I wanted to provide a deeper and more concise explanation, plus communicating not only the results but also their robustness. There is also a previous Longevity FAQ from Laura Deming, but I thought something …

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For the first time ever, the US government, through the NOAA will be funding geoengineering research A few very interesting adversarial collaborations posted at SSC When does abortion become wrong? Is eating meat a net harm? (Note that a few of the things mentioned there do not apply to countries other than the US. e.g. gestation crates are banned in the UK, so are battery cages for chicken) The Heckman curve is shown not to be true once again. Those cost/benefit ratios look off to me though. Can those in…

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Ten common statistical mistakes to watch out for when writing or reviewing a manuscript (Or when writing Nintil posts) The history of the structure of science funding in the US Innovation Growth Lab, a collection of RCTs on what works in science policy The benefits of allowing grant program management (extend, stop, modify grants as they go) vs the academic system where grants are usually more hands-off. China keeps making progress in quantum communications SENS's spinoff Oisin extends life in mice by 20% (…

Links (30)

Antioxidants are widely to be held either good or non-effective. But in some cases they can be bad, in particular promote cancer (in mice) What do we know about R&D spillovers and productivity? From a public policy perspective, our findings indicate that the case for public support for R&D investment (input subsidies) may not be as strong as has been assumed so far. We have established empirically that the direct productivity effect of own R&D is comparable to and usually larger than that of sp…

About the 'Progress' in Progress Studies

Tyler Cowen and Patrick Collison wrote two months ago a piece in The Atlantic calling for a new discipline, Progress Studies that would be very much applied and focused on improving the human condition. In my previous links post I linked to no less than eight manifestos or responses of some kind that were published some time after the original article, all show some degree of approval of this new proposal. In contrast, Twitter was a snakepit of snide and snark for a few days, with - what seems - mostly anth…

Links (29) & the mythical Cantonese gene

Paper argues that the performance (citations) of a scientific team is highly impacted by the performance (citations) of the weakest performing team member. Preventing the collapse of Civilization, by Jon Blow. He argues software is becoming worse, and that this is masked by ever improving hardware. A Case for Oxidation: Why the Rust programming language is great How does the sensation of touch arise, at a mollecular level? Fujitsu simulates a quantum computer with a classical computer (They built a digital …